The Long Drop to Short Text

Every author who seeks to independently publish their own work must face a transition from one end of the writing spectrum to the other, from many thousands of words, all arranged into punctuated sentences, to the 140 character limit of a tweet. After composing a symphony of words in isolation, you must find a few short notes that will be heard within a cacophony of constant noise.

I have found this a daunting prospect, since I devoted a lot of time to arranging over 330,000 words into a coherent narrative where every sentence served the story and moved it forwards. My writing is a reflection of myself, so I am loathed to make a casual tweet that I could later regret, but this creates a challenge. What can I say of value when confined to so few words?
Social media is an invaluable resource to an independent author, so joining the conversation is essential, but it is the largest collection of voices in the history of humanity, and that brings an array of new questions about how to proceed. None of this matters too much if you see social media as a means to build a network of contacts to enhance your personal life, but the tone is different if you have a desire to promote your work. You are your work, and vice versa, so any carelessness could affect how people choose to approach your invitation to sample what you have to offer.
I am sure that my view of short text messaging is a minority one, but it means that I feel compelled to put some effort into every tweet I compose. To borrow a famous saying from Winston Churchill and redefine it in a modern context: ‘Never in the field of human discourse was so much said by so many using so few words.’

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